IMPROVE YOUR TELEVISION RECEPTION

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How to improve your television reception

In Australia Television stations operate in either the Very High   Frequency (VHF) or Ultra High Frequency (UHF) bands.

VHF channels are numbered 6 to 12 and UHF channels 28 to 51.

UHF is widely used throughout regional Australia by the ABC, SBS and many commercial stations. Most new TV services transmit on UHF because the VHF band, which shared with FM radio, has become overcrowded.


How to tune your television

Each television set is a little different and you should follow your set’s instruction manual when retuning; however, you might find this a useful guide.

Automatic tuning

If your TV set has ‘automatic’ or ‘digital push button’ tuning, then just push the appropriate button and your pre-set channel UHF and VHF will appear. When activated, the automatic tuning device will search for and memorize TV  channels as they are located and display the number automatically selected   for that channel.

Rotary tuning
 If your TV set has a ‘rotary tuner’, then retuning is simply a matter of   carrying out the following steps:

  • Switch  off the AFT (automatic fine tuning). 
  • For        VHF - select the desired channel on the ‘main dial’ and adjust the fine      tuning ring until the picture appears at its clearest. 
  • For       UHF - select ‘U’ on the ‘main dial’, then turn the ‘UHF channel        selector’ knob to the desired channel. 
  • Switch   on the AFT again.

Push button tuning
 If your TV set has ‘push button’ tuning:

  • Switch   off the AFT. Sometimes this is done automatically when the tuning drawer   (or door) is opened. 
  • Push the button on which you want the new channel to appear. 
  • Open the tuning drawer (or door) on the set. This will reveal a series of        selectors and tuning wheels. Each selector and its adjacent tuning wheel        is associated with a tuning button on the front of the set. For example        the third tuning button is connected to the third selector switch and        the third tuning wheel. 
  • Set the selector switch to the range of channels required. Labeling of these channel ranges varies from brand to brand, but is usually one of the  following:

  

VLF Channels 0 to 5 Bands A 1, 2 VHL


VHF Channels 5A to 11 Band B 3 VH


UHF Channels 28 to 69 Bands C 4,5 UHF

  • Now, turn the corresponding tuning wheel slowly clockwise until the channels  you are seeking appears on the TV screen or until the little pointer indicates you have reached the end of the tuning range. If the selected  channel you are seeking does not appear, then begin turning the tuning   wheel anti-clockwise until the station is found. It generally takes  about twenty turns of the tuning wheel to cover the range of channels selected. 
  • When  your selected channel appears on the TV screen, adjust the tuning wheel  for the best picture and sound. 
  • Turn on the AFT and close the tuning drawer (or door).


How to install your antenna

The following information about antennas is a guide to their   installation. We suggests that a professional installers be called.

Choosing the right antenna

Outdoor antennas are preferred to the indoor variety whose performance   can be affected by wall insulation, plumbing, electrical wiring, roofing   materials and even people moving around a room.

Choice of an outdoor antenna depends on the channels in your area:

Very   High Frequency (VHF) 

  • Band        I antennas for channels 0 to 2 
  • Band        II antennas for channels 3 to 5 
  • Band        III antennas for channel 5A to 12 
  • Multi-channel        VHF antennas for channels 0 to 12

Ultra   High Frequency (UHF) 

  • Band        IV antennas for channels 28 to 35 
  • Band        V antennas for channels 39 to 69 
  • Band        IV/V antennas for channels 28 to 69 (in certain circumstances)

The UHF antenna size depends on how close you are to the transmitter.   In most areas, where you can see the transmitting station, a yagi antenna   with 8 to 10 elements or cross-pieces should be used.

At distances greater than 20km from the transmitter, or in difficult   terrain, a 10 to 18 element antenna will be needed. This type of antenna,   because of its length, may have to be mounted on a stronger mast.

In most locations, particularly where channels from both band 4 and   band 5 are used, a phased array antenna is usually suitable.

Check with a reputable antenna installer for the correct antenna for   your area.

Mounts or Masts
 Numerous forms of mounting brackets are available for antennas. These can   range from chimney brackets to fascia board mounts to free-standing masts for brackets to be bolted to the wall of your house.

Separate antennas for VHF and UHF signals are recommended. These can  be mounted on the same post or mast, but always ensure that the UHF antenna is positioned about 1 meter above the VHF antenna.

Mount the antenna on the mast in such a way that it and the   transmitter are in clear line of sight. It is usually best to mount an   antenna on the side of the house closest to the transmitter.

Installation Tips.
 When installing your antenna:

  • Disconnect  the power supply to your television set before starting any installation  work. 
  • Ground  your antenna mast electrically, using heavy gauge earthing        wire"6mm" and a grounded rod. This will protect anyone who        touches the antenna. It also offers your property some protection        against lightening. 
  • Mount the antenna clear of power lines. 
  • The minimum height is the width of the antenna (above the roof line). 
  • Check local government regulations for mast heights if you are installing an antenna above your roof line.

Position your antenna
Generally you should point the antenna towards the transmitting station. And   it is important that you have the antenna pointed at the correct signal source. For example, in some areas there is a main transmitter and a number of translators.

Shrubs and trees, building and hills in the direct path of your antenna may weaken the incoming signal and cause reception problems. If you cannot see the transmitting station, experiment by pointing the antenna in different directions-you may receive a stronger signal reflected off one of   the obstacles mentioned above.

The antenna cross-pieces will need to be either vertical or  horizontal, depending on the ‘polarisation’ of the transmission source.

Co-axial cable
Use low loss coaxial feeder cable to connect the antenna to the TV set. This   type of cable is suitable for both VHF and UHF signals.

Use the shortest possible length of cable as this will mean reduced signal loss. Prevent wind damage by attaching the cable firmly to the outside wall. From the cable into a half-loop where it enters the house so that rainwater will drip off. Seal the entry point.

Connections
It is very important that proper coaxial connections are used at each end of   the coaxial cable.

When connecting coaxial cable:

  • Cut back the outer cover 
  • Cut  back the center insulation 
  • Connect the center conductor cable to the antenna 
  • Ensure  that the shielding braid is firmly contacting the saddle clamp, being careful not to crush the cable by over tightening the saddle clamp. 
  • Coaxial  plugs and joints should be soldered or securely fastened with screw connections.

Antenna connection
Most antenna have a connector box where the coaxial cable is connected to the   antenna. If yours does not have such a box, then a balun is required. This   piece of equipment has a coaxial connection at one end and a ribbon at the   other.

If your antenna needs a balun, connect the ribbon end to the antenna   terminals, and the coaxial cable down lead to the coaxial connection. Position the antenna balun so that it won’t collect rainwater.

A balun will also be needed at the TV end of the cable if the TV has   only ribbon-type connections. Connect the ribbon to the terminals on your   set, and plug the coaxial into the balun.

Diplexer
A diplexer combines signals from VHF and UHF antennas into one output cable   which can then be connected to your TV set. Diplexers can be mounted either   near the antennas or near the TV.

You only need a diplexer when a TV set has just the one input socket   for both VHF and UHF cables. Separate input sockets mean that a diplexer is   unnecessary.

Splitter
 More than one TV set can be connected to your outdoor antenna. A splitter  takes an input signal from one cable and divides it between two or more   outputs.

Amplifier
 If you use a splitter you will find that signal strength is reduced and that  you may need a masthead or distribution amplifier. This equipment boosts the signal before it is fed into the splitter and ensures that signals of   adequate strength are supplied to each connected set.

A professional antenna installer can measure the signal strength at  your home and recommend the type of equipment needed

Combined Splitter/Amplifiers are also available.

FM rejection filters
FM broadcast signals can sometimes interfere with television signals and   cause annoying patterns in the picture. The problem occurs where high level   FM signals are present at the input of a television receiver.

This can often be solved by fitting an FM rejection filter to the   receiver’s antenna input at the back of the television set. This filter is   sometimes described as an FM trap.

The filter enables receivers to reject FM sound signals, thus   preventing them from interfering with most television signals. However, they   are unable to protect Band II channels (channels 3,4 and 5) because these   television signals would be filtered out along with the unwanted FM radio   signals.

Down converter
 Older VHF-only TV sets will need a down converter to alter the UHF signal so   that it can be used by the VHF set. Most video cassette recorders can used as   a down converter. Check the manufacturer’s specifications of your VCR.

Master Antenna Systems "MATV"
Many hotels, apartment buildings, hospitals and office blocks provide wall-mounted antenna sockets which are connected by cable to a master antenna. A professional installer should do this work. Please ensure that the cable used for such connections is high quality coaxial cable.

If it is necessary to install an FM filter to such a system, it should  be fitted between the receiving antenna and the first amplifier in the distribution system.


INTERFERENCE

  

INTERFERENCE

In this page, I set out a number of checks that should be carried out before blaming all and sundry for that squiggle on the ABC every Sunday night while "The Bill" is on. I also discuss a number of typical Interference sources and touch on ways to identify the source.

Firstly, MAKE SURE ITS NOT YOUR OWN FAULT. I know of countless instances where the "interference" was simply a deficiency in the TV set, VCR or the Aerial of the customer affected.

If you have TV interference, it's worth while to call in an Aerial Technician initially to give the aerial system a thorough going over as a first step. He may point out matters to you which should be attended to or simply point out that it looks like a crook TV or similar. The second step is to have a TV Technician check over the equipment and give it a clean bill of health.

If both of these tradesmen agree that it is external interference, then it's time to take the next step: What sort of Interference do I have?

The most common forms of external interference which are often found in the community are;

High Voltage Power Line Interference - Very common

Thermostats and other power control circuits - reasonably common

Other electronic equipment (VCR, Computer etc)- reasonably common

Series motors and other small hand tools - not common

Radiocommunications (Amateurs, CB, broadcast, two way, TV stations) - not common

Pay TV cable leakage (signal egress) - not common

Radio Frequency heating equipment - not common

Other more exotic sources

The first port of call is the Australian Communications Authority (sorry guys). They will provide you free advice and a booklet containing photographs of a range of interference sources. The booklet also gives advice as to the course of action to eliminate the source.

Additionally, there are sites on TV interference on the web, much more comprehensive than this simple attempt. You might try starting with the FCC site and then browse around a bit.

What do I do if I identify the interference from the pictures in the ACA booklet "Better Television and Radio Reception"?

If you think you have nailed the source the booklet will direct you to the appropriate course to rectify your problem. For instance, if your problem is identified as Power Line Interference, the really only effective solution is to contact your Power Reticulation Company. They have the necessary wherewithal to tackle the problem. Sometimes, friends, relatives or acquaintances will tell you suburban myths about "dirty insulators" and cleaning them with a jet of water. DO NOT DO THIS -DO NOT EVEN ATTEMPT TO DO THIS. Why do you think power companies spend a lot of money on specialised high pressure pumping equipment and insulated work platforms?

If the booklet identifies your problem as a Radio transmitter, the most straightforward identification option is to go outside and look straight up in the air. Any radio transmitter close enough to cause you a serious problems will have a transmit aerial close enough for you to spot fairly readily. The next step is to sort out what sort of radio you are dealing with and its approximate frequency of operation. Knowing this, filters can be fitted to keep the radio signal OUT of your TV or Radio set. In most cases, it is a deficiency in the TV or Radio which allows the interference to occur. Keep the signal OUT and remove the problem. Typically, a CB radio or a "High Frequency" Amateur Radio Station may require a filter on the aerial input to the TV or radio and perhaps some attention to the power line (which may be acting as an aerial for reception of the extraneous signal). It may be appropriate to seek some assistance from a skilled technician if this becomes necessary. Try fitting a "High Pass" filter which you will find in your local electronics sales emporium to your Television (or VCR) antenna input socket. If the problem is caused by two way radio transmitters (as opposed to the hobby services - CB and Amateur) or perhaps caused by the Very High Frequency Amateur Radio transmitters, you need an expert straight away. Don't waste your time with some goose who installs antennas part time out of the boot of his EH. At the very least, consult a member of the Antenna Technicians Association.

To identify the location of most of the junk that is radiated from domestic switching devices - thermostats, series motors, light control, faulty switches, etc, try listening for a corresponding interference with a portable radio receiver. If you can hear the corresponding rauccous noise, attend at your power distribution board with the portable radio, wait for the interference. When it commences, shut down all of the power to your house and listen for a coincidental cessation of the interference on the portable radio receiver. Did it stop? If it did, your problem is inside the house. If it didn't, it's elsewhere. If it seems to be inside the house, do the same test with each individual power circuit, until you can identify a particular fuse or breaker where the problem is residing. Individually inspect each appliance connected to that circuit. Do not neglect power outlets which may be in the ceiling space or under the floor. Once you can identify the appliance concerned - call the service representative to deal with the particular appliance.

There are many sources which are not covered in this page. One of the most common problems seen these days is what is called "switch mode power supply radiation". Briefly, most electronic equipment these days does not use a transformer to derive the various voltage levels which may be required in any appliance. Instead, they use "switch mode power supplies". These can be considered as similar to a light dimmer. They accept mains voltage in and have a preset level out which they derive by "switching" on and off as needed, to only allow sufficient of the mains through to create the particular output voltage required. In the process of switching on and off, switching transients cause small white spots to be seen on the TV screen. These spots generally are fairly evenly distributed over the screen, although sometimes they seem to clump together. They usually form fairly regular lines of spots. The lines can be either straight or curved and may swing around and vary as you watch the TV depending on the stability of the switching process. Often, people refer to these lines as "isobars" on the TV screen. Channel 2 is the station which is most commonly affected by this form of interference - because of its frequency of operation. If you think this is your problem, you need to isolate any electronic equipment near your TV. The most common sources are the TV set itself, the VCR which is usually adjacent, or sometimes, where it is in use, a Pay TV decoder. You need to bypass the aerial from each suspect device, one at a time, and then pull the power plug out of the wall for that device. If you notice an abrupt cessation of interference, it's time to call the serviceman for that particular appliance.

AMPLIFIERS. Mast head or Distribution types. There are considerations that need to be considered when deciding what sort to select. It's probably best to leave it to an expert (me) to make that selection. Its no good feeding a tiny, tiny signal into an amp and expecting all your problems to evaporate. Amplifiers are not intelligent, they amplify everything equally - desired signal, noise, interference, everything. If you have very weak signal, it would be better to upgrade the aerial and cable distribution before considering whether an Amplifier will be of any benefit to you or not.

Final note. Don't do it yourself. The additional cost of a professional installation is more than offset by the savings in blood pressure tablets alone. Find a member of the Association to do the job for you. There's nothing worse than paying the same amount of money to an incompetent monkey as a committed professional and finding out 6 weeks later that the coach screws he used were too small and he's gone out of business, or worse, he drops the aerial on your nice new shiny Jag in the driveway. Insurance? What Insurance? Members of the Association carry a minimum of $5,000,000.00 and are in the industry for the long haul. If you need them, they will be there.

Digital Television is coming. Don't get conned that your current set, or the one your about to buy is Analog/Digital compatible. As far as we can determine, there are no digital sets in the Country. In fact, they're still arguing about the Audio standard we will transmit, so there's nobody even tooling up to produce something for us yet. Don't be conned into buying a special "Digital Aerial" either. In most cases, your existing Antenna will perform adequately. There may be problems in individual situations, especially when it comes to receiving the Melbourne ABC digital signal.

Broadcaster  Current Channel  Proposed Digital Channel

ABC  2  12

HSV  7  6

GTV  9  8

ATV  10  11

SBS  28  29

The table above indicates the ABC will transmit on channel 12. Most of our current antennas are designed to work up to channel 10 only. They will probably function sufficiently well for channel 11 (ATV digital), whether they continue to work on channel 12 - time will tell. There are some manufacturers who have bitten the bullet and started to redesign their range of antennas to include all of the bandwidth that will be used for Analog and Digital broadcasts. If you are just commencing to have an antenna installed, one of those may be better than the old cheap and nasty one that the current bloke is planning to stick up for you. Ask what he intends to install and its bandwidth. Look for the specifications on the packaging material. If you want it to provide both Analogue and Digital signals, it has to have a bandwidth from 2 to 12 for Melbourne use.

Other difficulties which will hit digital TV will be current installations where careless installations of Amplifiers (boosters) result in poor Carrier to Noise ratios. Additionally, all amplifiers will have to be de-rated to handle the extra power coming down the antenna lead in cable. If the Amplifier was just barely coping before, digital will, in all likelihood, push it over the edge. Finally, adjacent channel problems and "intermodulation" products may start to cause serious problems for the cheaper installations. If your having an installation done now, ask the installer if the Amp he is using will cope with the changes ahead. Insist on a straight answer.

Digital training for antenna installers is commencing, but if the person you're looking at installing an aerial claims to be "Digital Approved" or similar, look carefully - approved by who, for what. Installations I currently do are to the best of my knowledge, suitable for the reception of Digital signals. I use quality cable and every distribution component is connected with the use of "F" connectors. I consider the effect of digital signals on every job I do, trying to anticipate problems that are coming. I recommend a quick browse of the ABA, Standards Australia Digital Broadcasting Australia, Digital Television Group or the CAI websites to get a feel of Digital Television and the installation of suitable distribution components to accommodate it. You might like to check out the links page at the ATA site for a more comprehensive list of appropriate links. The Antenna Technicians Association is currently negotiating to develop a suitable training course, based on real needs and existing circumstances. A suitably qualified ATA member is going to be your best bet in the future.

Stay tuned, either here, or the ATA site for Digital updates and the effects on aerial installations.

CABLE. Many people will think nothing of spending a huge sum of money on an aerial, and because they have overspent the budget there, they scrimp in the purchase of the cable. WRONG. The excellent aerial signal you just got off the beaut aerial has attenuated before it gets to the TV set or else there are structural flaws which reduce the clarity of the picture. I use RG6 cable exclusively. Wherever possible, I use "F" connectors and compatible signal distribution equipment. The cable I use is dual screened 60% or 75% copper braid and 100% aluminium foil bonded to a solid dielectric -Belden or Times Fibre type.

IF YOU'RE THINKING OF PURCHASING NEW VCR OR OTHER ANCILLARY DEVICES, CHECK THAT IT WILL WORK ANYWHERE OVER THE UHF BAND, SO THAT YOU CAN FIND A CLEAR SPOT TO USE IT.

When digital transmissions start in Ballarat, there will be another 5 channels coming into use, crowding these VCR's just a little bit more. So Plan ahead get one that covers the hole uhf band.

Have you considered a member of the Antenna Technicians Association?

To professionally install or repair your television antenna system?

The member will, prior to the start of the installation carry out a

FIELD STRENGTH SURVEY

With the aid of a field strength meter (not a portable television).

This will determine the following:

• Location of the antenna (the existing antenna mast/position may not be the best location)

• Height and direction of the antenna on the mast

• Type of antenna required (combination, phased array, yagi and channels to be received)

• Available signal strength (a television requires 60 to 75 dB for clear picture reproduction)

• This allows the technician to determine if an amplifier is required, what type (masthead or distribution) and the level of gain. SO dB signal strength or less means a snowy picture.

ATA MEMBERS USE:

• The Technical Standards as laid down„by the Antenna Technicians Association Inc.

• Isolated wall outlets or sockets. This helps to prevent possible electrocution from faulty televisions. (Outlets connected to low voltage line powered equipment may prevent this)

• RG59 / 6 / 11 twin screened coaxial cable. (Single screen air spaced cable has greater signal loss at higher frequencies‑UHF, with less resistance to electrical and other interference)

You may also request the technician to demonstrate to you, the expected picture quality on a test television prior to giving your approval for the installation. On completion, the ATA member will record the signal strength of each individual channel and the picture quality on your invoice. 

Whilst members will guarantee their own workmanship and materials used for a specific period, no guarantee can be made or given regarding the reception quality. There are several external factors beyond the control of the technician, which can and do affect the quality of the finished installation, some of which include, but are not limited to the following;

• distance signal must travel (from point of transmission)

• objects in the signal path (trees, buildings, hills)

• seasonal changes (co channel interference, deciduous trees, sunspot activity)

• atmospheric conditions

• signal reflections (ghosting)

• quality of the signal source (relay translator)

• external interference (power line, radio transmitter, domestic appliances, etc)

IMPORTANCE OF VIDEO MAINTENANCE AND FACTORS CAUSING HEADWEAR

TO ALL VIDEO RECORDER OWNER

This suggestion sheet will help you to maintain your Video recorder in good working order, and if the suggestions are carried out, will reduce wear resulting in a longer period of good viewing.

IMPORTANCE OF VIDEO MAINTENANCE AND FACTORS CAUSING HEADWEAR

The four main enemies of your Video Recorder are: Dust, Poorly Manufactured Tapes, Excessive Heat and Dampness.

DUST

Dust can get between the tape and video heads and cause scouring. Excessive scouring of the video heads results in the appearance of horizontal lines on your television screen.

Place your video in a position free from dust and always store video tapes in their cases away from the dusty atmosphere.

POORLY MANUFACTURED TAPE

There are a number of blank video tapes for sale on the market today. Many poorer quality tapes shed the oxide layer which in turn causes damage to the video heads.

Using worn tapes should be avoided as they introduce unnecessary wear to com­ponents and they lessen the life of your video heads.

EXCESSIVE HEAT

Ensure your video recorder is kept in an area where heat build up cannot occur. Adequate ventilation is important

DAMPNESS

Although most video recorders today are equipped with DEW devices, so they will not operate under damp conditions, you should ensure that your video recorder and video tapes are kept away from humid or damp areas.

CLEANING TAPES

The use of most "dry" cleaning cassettes, particularly if they are used too often is not recommended. These products can never do the job as well as a trained technician and can instead create additional headwear, reducing the life of your video heads.

MAINTENANCE

We suggest you have your Video cleaned professionally once a year, as lack of main­tenance can lead to excessive head wear and premature head replacement. Replacement of heads is costly.

Question: Why am I told to buy only reputable brand name tapes?

Answer: To be sure damage wilt not occur to the video as a result of using poorly manufactured video tapes. Cheaper tapes made from less reliable com­pounds will shed the oxide layer inside your machine and reduce video head life.

Question: What should I do when first using a new tape?

Answer: A wise practice with new tapes is to run them in the 'fast forward' and then 'rewind' mode once before use. This adjusts the tension in a cassette.

Question: How should I store tapes?

Answer:  Store all cassettes in their sleeve, making sure that the tape edge is away from the opening. This prevents dust getting into the video cassette.

Store tapes vertically and fully rewound, as this will reduce the chance of the tape sticking to the wall of the case, causing damage to the tape ends.

Question: Can I splice a video tape?

Answer: Do not attempt to do this. Even a slightly wrong join can cause damage to your video heads, seek the advice of your service agent.

FOR YOUR PROTECTION DEAL WITH A MEMBER OF T.E.S.A. 

PRESENTED WITH COMPLIMENTS BY TES.A. FROM: 

RICHARD WATERS ELECTRONICS

BROADCASTER'S

They relate to Television Broadcasting, Legislation and reception equipment.    

Here are some others which may be  useful

Broadcaster's       Sites:

 

ABC OnlineABC


http://www.abc.net.au

 

     SBS


http://www.sbs.com.au

 

i7 icanSEVEN


http://www.seven.com.au

 

ninemsn homeNINE


http://www.ninemsn.com.au

 

TV ShowsTEN


http://www.ten.com.au

       

PRIME


http://www.primetv.com.au

       

WIN


http://www.wintv.com.au

 

TEN VICTORIA


http://www.tenvic.com.au

 

SEVEN CENTRAL


http://www.telecasters.com.au/sevencentral

 

IMPARJA


http://www.imparja.com.au

GOLDEN       WEST http://www.gwn.com.au    

Government       Sites:

 

The Australian Communications AuthorityAustralian

Communications

Authority


http://www.aca.gov.au

 

ABA Copyright, disclaimer notice and privacy policyAustralian

Broadcasting

Authority


http://www.aba.gov.au

 

DCITA logoDepartment       of

Communications

Information

Technology       and the

Arts


http://www.dcita.gov.au

 

Other       Associations:

 

dbaDigital

Broadcasting

Australia


http://www.dba.org.au

 

Digital

Television

Group       (UK)


http://www.dtg.org.uk

 

Confederation       of 

Aerial

Industries       Ltd


http://www.cai.org.uk

 

Electronic

Services

Industry

Association


http://www.esia.org.au  

 

Federation       of

Australian

Commercial

Television

Stations

http://www.facts.org.au    

Australian

Captions

Centre

http://www.auscap.com.au          

http://www.hills.com.au

 

Welcome to Matchmaster Communications

Matchmaster         Communications


http://www.matchmaster.com.au

                Standard Communications Pty Ltd    

Kingray/GME           Electrophone


http://www.gme.net.au  


MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICE

Welcome to our news site We will be setting this site up to keep you information with up to date information regarding new antenna booster etc.

Also we will be setting up this for other company wishing to put the company links on this site.

If you want to include your business on here please e-mail E-Mail to COLACTV@GMAIL.COM   

Watch out when you call a trades person. Have a look at the pix below.

A customer rang our company saying there was a lot of interference on both TV's  , so we went out and investigated and this what we had found. 

This was ment to be a two splitter.  The customer informed us a electrician had did the job. I must say he when to a lot of trouble to do this as you can see. Check the bottom picture

 

It must have taken an hour to do this . Soldering , sealing and tape.  

Supplied by the Antenna  Technicians Association Inc 

Power supply fault. Recently, one of our Members, Julian Knox, received a telephone call on a weekend. I reproduce the

general thrust of the conversation here, with apologies to all concerned;

Caller Hello, is that J Knox Antenna Installations?

Julian Yes it is, how can I help you.

Caller I’ve got a problem with my television reception and was wondering if you could come and have a look at it.

Julian Certainly, what day would be convenient for me to call?

Caller I was hoping you could come straight away

Julian It is Sunday night you know

Caller Yes, I know, it’s just that there is a smell of burning plastic and I’d hate for my house to catch fire.

Julian Oh! You better give me your address and I’ll come straight over.

What Julian found was very frightening, and I have to point out, Julian was the repairer, not the installer. At this customer’s

home, the unfortunate combination of slack installer, poor fitment of components, poor quality cable and Cockatoos, all came

together to create a potential fire hazard. I’m sure everyone is familiar with the Kingray MH21 power supply. It is a mains

connected device, designed to be fitted vertically on some form of mounting board or beam. It has a plastic housing which

encloses the mains connected parts of the power supply to avoid accidental contact by the user. Julian found that the installer

had used the very best quality air spaced cable, which we all know is completely irresistible to our avian friend, the Sulphur

Crested Cockatoo. The picture below shows the slight damage (in this instance) caused by an inquisitive white buzzard that

has thereafter allowed water to enter the cable. The high quality hose pipe, errrr sorry, air spaced dielectric co-axial cable,

ducted the water directly to the next occurring distribution component in the network. In this case, the unfortunate recipient

was a Kingray MH21 power supply, lying on its back inside the roof space. The plastic housing of the power supply acted just

like a little bucket capable of holding 286 mL of water (less component volume). I guess the mains devices inside would have

boiled the water off just about the same as my electric kettle I keep bubbling away here, while I’m typing up these notices.

Anyway, at some time, the heat and the moisture has resulted in the plastic housing catching fire. The fact that Julian was

called due to the smell is indicative that this problem would have just kept on keeping on, with a real chance of a house fire.

Fire damaged power supply Bird damaged co-axial cable

 

Generally speaking, Power supplies that catch fire do not provide the optimum voltage out, to drive the Mast Head amplifier.

Fire in Power Supplies should be avoided as often as possible. Members need to take stock of their installation practices. Lets

make sure that we’re not the one’s attending a Coroner’s Court explaining how we installed a power supply. Pay attention to

Manufacturer’s Installation notes. I’m sure Kingray will be less than impressed with this installation.

To avoid this happening to you call a professional A.T.A So the jobs done right first time. 

HAVE YOU CONSIDERED A MEMBER OF THE ANTENNA TECHNICIANS ASSOCIATION?

Welcome to our news site We will be setting this site up to keep you information with up to date information regarding new antenna booster etc.

Also we will be setting up this for other company wishing to put the company links on this site.

If you want to include your business on here please e-mail E-Mail to COLACTV@GMAIL.COM   

Watch out when you call a trades person. Have a look at the pix below.

A customer rang our company saying there was a lot of interference on both TV's  , so we went out and investigated and this what we had found. 

This was ment to be a two splitter.  The customer informed us a electrician had did the job. I must say he when to a lot of trouble to do this as you can see. Check the bottom picture

 

It must have taken an hour to do this . Soldering , sealing and tape.  

Supplied by the Antenna  Technicians Association Inc 

Power supply fault. Recently, one of our Members, Julian Knox, received a telephone call on a weekend. I reproduce the

general thrust of the conversation here, with apologies to all concerned;

Caller Hello, is that J Knox Antenna Installations?

Julian Yes it is, how can I help you.

Caller I’ve got a problem with my television reception and was wondering if you could come and have a look at it.

Julian Certainly, what day would be convenient for me to call?

Caller I was hoping you could come straight away

Julian It is Sunday night you know

Caller Yes, I know, it’s just that there is a smell of burning plastic and I’d hate for my house to catch fire.

Julian Oh! You better give me your address and I’ll come straight over.

What Julian found was very frightening, and I have to point out, Julian was the repairer, not the installer. At this customer’s

home, the unfortunate combination of slack installer, poor fitment of components, poor quality cable and Cockatoos, all came

together to create a potential fire hazard. I’m sure everyone is familiar with the Kingray MH21 power supply. It is a mains

connected device, designed to be fitted vertically on some form of mounting board or beam. It has a plastic housing which

encloses the mains connected parts of the power supply to avoid accidental contact by the user. Julian found that the installer

had used the very best quality air spaced cable, which we all know is completely irresistible to our avian friend, the Sulphur

Crested Cockatoo. The picture below shows the slight damage (in this instance) caused by an inquisitive white buzzard that

has thereafter allowed water to enter the cable. The high quality hose pipe, errrr sorry, air spaced dielectric co-axial cable,

ducted the water directly to the next occurring distribution component in the network. In this case, the unfortunate recipient

was a Kingray MH21 power supply, lying on its back inside the roof space. The plastic housing of the power supply acted just

like a little bucket capable of holding 286 mL of water (less component volume). I guess the mains devices inside would have

boiled the water off just about the same as my electric kettle I keep bubbling away here, while I’m typing up these notices.

Anyway, at some time, the heat and the moisture has resulted in the plastic housing catching fire. The fact that Julian was

called due to the smell is indicative that this problem would have just kept on keeping on, with a real chance of a house fire.

Fire damaged power supply Bird damaged co-axial cable

 

Generally speaking, Power supplies that catch fire do not provide the optimum voltage out, to drive the Mast Head amplifier.

Fire in Power Supplies should be avoided as often as possible. Members need to take stock of their installation practices. Lets

make sure that we’re not the one’s attending a Coroner’s Court explaining how we installed a power supply. Pay attention to

Manufacturer’s Installation notes. I’m sure Kingray will be less than impressed with this installation.

To avoid this happening to you call a professional A.T.A So the jobs done right first time. 

DSB/VSB MODULATORS

 

     

We Recommend all Kingray Products 

DSB/VSB       MODULATORS

Modulators  are designed to convert a base band or A.V. (Audio Video) signal               into an RF signal. This allows the outputs from set-top boxes, videos, DVD's, AM and FM tuners, CD players or cameras to be integrated into any television system. By using Kingray and               Teleste's wide variety of agile modulators (able to adjust the RF  output frequencies via dip switches or software) a flexible               solution is available to suit each individual system.         Double Sideband (DSB) Modulator  The DSB modulator uses both upper and lower sidebands. This means at least one, sometimes two channel spaces need to                       be left so that the modulators don't interfere with each other. While relatively cheap, it uses extra bandwidth.             Vestigial                 Sideband (VSB) Modulator             The  VSB Modulator has the second sideband filtered out. This allows you to place modulated channels adjacent to each  other. The second or lower sideband must be attenuated  by 60 dB or more so it will not interfere with adjacent                       channels. More expensive due to superior filtering but makes more channels available.            

     

                             Kingray have developed a new range of modulator products that can be rack mounted or individually installed. The ideas have come from your feedback. It is a product range that has been designed to be as flexible as possible yet suit numerous requirements including all future digital  products. These products are the KR (Kingray Racking)  Series and include a Passive Combiner, Powering Facility,                       Wall Mount, 19” Subrack, Double Sideband Modulators and                       a range of new generation Distribution Amplifiers. Products currently being developed in the same series will  include V.S.B. Modulators, Demodulators and a Digital                       Processing Headend.                     MD100V  & MD100U    

The MD100V (44-320 MHz) [230 mA @ 18V DC] and the MD100U   (470-860 MHz) [180 mA @ 18V DC] replace the three MD80 models. They are both double sideband modulators with basic audio/video inputs and agile RF output. The outputs                       are phase lock looped to provide stability and can be set  in 250 kHz steps. A test switch has been included toassist with the initial setup. (There is an external 5.5                       MHz input for optional future use with a demodulator as a channel converter).

To provide extra flexibility these units can have an output of anywhere between 65-105 dB. This is achieved by the use of a 20 dB gain control and a switch. The MD100's have been build in the new die-cast housing for extra shielding and can be rack mounted/powered, powered individually or Remote powered.

Two  power options are available: PSK18S  for single units.
PSK18KR for multiple units.      

(The MD100V is currently undergoing further development to increase the bandwidth to 44-470 MHz).